The popular live streaming site, Twitch.tv, told their users to change passwords as a possible breach in the system caused personal data to be seen by hackers.

Twitch.tv is a live streaming video platform owned by Amazon.com. The site heavily focuses on video gaming, which range from playthroughs of currently popular games, to real time competitions and tournaments. Viewed by millions of people each month, Twitch is one of the most popular and preferred live streaming sites out there.

Twitch offers users to ‘subscribe’ to people for a small fee each month. The subscription allows you to have many benefits; however these are mainly channel dependent and the perks you receive from subscribing may differ. Quite a lot of live streamers offer people to talk in the Twitch chat, have access to stickers and enter competitions. It also shows the live streamer that you are enjoying their content and wish to see more. Essentially showing your support through the means of donations.

Unfortunately though, users who have an account set up with Twitch or have connected their account through other services were told their names, phone numbers and other personal details may have been leaked by a recent attack on the site. This information came from an email which read: ‘we are writing to let you know that there may have been unauthorized access to some of your Twitch user account information, including possibly your Twitch username and associated email addresses, your password (which was cryptographically protected), the last IP address you logged in from, and any of the following if you provided it to us: first and last name, phone number, address, date of birth…’.

‘… For your protection, we have expired your password and stream keys. In addition, if you had connected your account to Twitter or YouTube, we have terminated this connection…’

The email followed by saying: ‘You will be prompted to create a new password the next time you attempt to log into your Twitch account. If applicable, you will also need to reconnect your account to Twitter and YouTube, and re-authenticate through Facebook, once you change your password’.

Nevertheless, on the Twitch blog, it was never stated whether or not the site had been attacked, it just read: ‘there may have been unauthorized access to some Twitch user account information.

David Emm, the principal security researcher at Kaspersky Lab said: ‘fortunately, in this instance passwords were encrypted, minimising the risk of passwords being used by hackers. However, the fact that names, addresses and other personal details were not will be cause for concern for many customers’.

Does this mean Twitch will start encrypting more personal information in case of any future attacks? It’s too soon to say; however it has been recommended that you choose a password of at least 12 characters long that contains a mixture of numbers, letters and symbols to ensure extra security.

Do you have an account with Twitch? Have you been affected by what has happened? Tweet @TechFlyOfficial to let us know what you think, as well as keep up to date on new articles and news that may follow.

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Dominic Joseph McLaughlin - Web Developer & Editorial Administrator.

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